Cliff Diving 101

Who needed to watch the ball drop in Times Square, if you were looking for New Year’s Eve excitement? We had Congress giving us plenty of excitement (and heart attacks) with their dillydallying about the “fiscal cliff”. For better or for worse, the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 was signed into law on January 2, 2013, and thank you very much, but I’ll stay out of any political discussion as to whether it’s good or bad for American taxpayers. What I will do is summarize a few of the key provisions of the “Act”, for your reading pleasure/misery.

Individual Income Tax Rates

The Act retains the 10%, 15%, 25%, 28%, and 33% marginal tax rates that had been in effect previously. The 35% tax bracket will end at $400K of taxable income (single) and $450K taxable income (joint). Above those thresholds, the 39.6% rate that was in effect “pre-Bush-tax-cuts” will kick in.

Estate and Trust Tax Rates

The top rate for estates and trusts rises to 39.6%, for taxable income over $11,950. As you can see, the top tax rate kicks in at a comparatively low taxable income amount, so executors and trustees are advised that whenever possible/practical, the income should be distributed out of estates/trusts to beneficiaries, especially when the beneficiaries are in a lower tax bracket than the estate/trust.

Long-term Capital Gains and Qualified Dividends

In recent tax years, long-term capital gains and qualified dividends have generally enjoyed a relatively low 15% tax rate. This will continue under “The Act”, but (always a but, eh?!) in cases where taxpayer’s taxable income (including the gains and the dividends) exceeds that magic threshold of $400K single/$450K joint, long-term gains and qualified dividends will be taxed at 20%.

15% Tax Rate Bracket for Joint Filers

The size of the 15% bracket for joint filers remains at 200% of the size of the 15% bracket for single taxpayers. Before all you single taxpayers run off to get married, keep in mind that this 200% amount does not apply to higher brackets, and remember what as I said above, about the top 39.6% bracket for joint taxpayers being only $50K higher than it is for single taxpayers, so there will definitely be some “marriage penalty” effects.

Standard Deduction For Joint Filers

The standard deduction for joint returns will remain at 200% of the standard deduction for single taxpayers, woo hoo!

Itemized Deduction Phase-Outs

This is something that we haven’t had to face for a few years, and it’s baaack! Beginning in 2013, when Adjusted Gross Income, (not taxable income) exceeds $250K single/$300K joint, itemized deductions will generally be reduced by 3% of AGI. The net effect here is to actually increase your effective tax rate. It’s been estimated that taxpayers in the 33% bracket will effectively pay 33.99%, those in the 35% bracket will effectively pay 36.05%, and those in the 39.6% bracket will effectively pay 40.79%!

There are a lot more provisions to the Act, but I think I’ve been more than sadistic enough by telling you about the items above. For CPAs like me, each of these tax acts should really be called “The Tax Preparer Job Security Act”, since it keeps all of us busy, sorting through provisions, and advising our clients.

Questions? Comments? Gripes? Feel free to leave a comment. Stay tuned for more “stupid Congress tricks”!

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